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D L Moody on Christianity vs. Freemasonry


"I do not see how any Christian, most of all a Christian minister, can go into these secret lodges with unbelievers.  They say they can have more influence for good, but I say that they can have more influence for good by staying out of them, and then reproving their evil deeds.  Abraham had more influence for good in Sodom than Lot had.  If twenty-five Christians go into a secret lodge with fifty who are not Christians, the fifty can vote anything they please, and the twenty-five will be partakers of their sins.  They are unequally yoked with unbelievers.  ‘But, Mr. Moody,’ some say, ‘If you talk that way you will drive all the members of secret societies out of your meetings and out of your churches.’  But what if I do?  Better men will take their places.  Give them the truth anyway, and if they would rather leave their churches than their lodges, the sooner they get out of their churches the better. I would rather have ten members who are separated from the world than a thousand such members!  Come out from the lodge. Better one with God than a thousand without Him!  We must walk with God, and if only one or two go with us, it is all right.  Do not let down the standard to suit men who love their secret lodges or have some darling sin they will not give up!" (D. L Moody)

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