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A Poem I wrote for my church for Maundy Thursday


A deep sorrow could be felt in the Upper Room
Silent and unspoken it spoke of His doom

Jesus lifted the bread off the table and gave it a tear
Around to the disciples he passed it to share

“This is my body, it is broken for you"
By His death He is able to make all things new.

Then he took the cup and said with a stare,
“This cup is for you,” and he passed it with care.

“It is the sign of a new covenant by my blood shed,”
He drank it with us as he lowered his head

With a sense of wonder and awe we all left the table
Off to Gethsemane, urging, “Pray while you’re able”

Not long after he would be betrayed by a kiss
A devising of Judas straight from the abyss

They chained him and beat him and took him by night
We disciples panicked and ran in a cowardly flight

Soon they took him before the Council in an unjust court
The verdict was pre-determined and the trial was short

“Off to the Romans,” to make them do the dirt
Spoke up Caiaphas the priest with his torn apart shirt

At first Pilate wondered whether this man justly should die
After all he knew the Council had hatched some big lie

But he was convinced by a conniving word by the Jews
“If you allow this King to live, Caesar will hear of the news”

And off went Jesus up to the place where he would hang
The wooden beams would shake with each hammer bang

His first words were spoken while they lifted him high
“Father, forgive them they know not,” his merciful cry

Two criminals beside him both lashed out with hate
Then one was deeply convicted as he considered his fate

“I am here for my crimes, as painful the terror
But this man has done no wrong; he is without error”

He looked over to Jesus and asked with a grave plea
“Jesus when you get to your throne, remember me?”

Jesus next words are without equal in mercy and grace,
“I tell you today in paradise we shall meet face to face”

He breathed his last and his head hung without movement
Taken down by the soldiers and to Joseph’s entombment

We all hid for three days so we would not the same fate bear,
It was the women who were visited by Him and told not to fear

Soon we met Him ourselves straight from that old tomb
He broke through death, and man’s ultimate doom

Believe in the Lord Jesus and trust in The Savior
Trust not in yourselves or your own good behavior

After this comes the Holy Spirit whom Jesus would send
Keeping us focused and faithful as we await the glorious end.

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