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Freemasonry: A cult?


For a while now I have been trying to understand Freemasonry. It is perhaps the most convoluted group of teachings of any society I've seen. It is extremely hard to pinpoint what masons actually believe. Most of the stuff you find against freemasons is equally whacky. There are numerous conspiracy theories alleged, along with accusations concerning the worship of Satan.

However, here is what can be absolutely determined.

1) Freemasonry is syncretistic. In other words it brings together different religions, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Paganism, Buddhism, etc. To become a mason you simply must believe in a god. It seems especially taken with mysticism (Kabbala, Rosicrucianism, gnosticism).

2) Freemasonry is a secret society and a religion. Though they deny both of these, their practices and writing affirm both. It is a society that is secretive about its rites and rituals (hence secret society). To reach various degrees you must swear an oath of secrecy. It is a religion. It includes prayer, rituals, moral systems, chaplains, beliefs about salvation, heaven, and morality (hence a religion).

3) Freemasonry teaches salvation by works. There are clear teachings that affirm that it is through good works that we attain salvation into the 'celestial lodge'. This salvation, as well as its symbols, is offered to people of any religion and therefore is not about the gospel of Christ.

Having said all this, these are the clear markers of a cult (which is why at least the Anglican and Roman Catholic church has labelled Freemasonry as heretical). Churches should be careful. One thinks about the letters to the churches in Revelation which warn the churches about the dangers of allowing false teaching to run rampant. It will effect the spiritual health of the church. What is more it is a dishonor to the sacrificial death of Christ in our behalf, the only means by which we can be saved. In him and him alone is our salvation.

The best resources available on the subject that I have found are from The Christian Research Institute (www.equip.org) A reputable ministry that does good work. Follow the links below:

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