Skip to main content

George Whitefield's Crypt - Old South Church, Newburyport, MA

One of the blessings of living in New England is that history is right in our back yard. The great evangelist/preacher of the Great Awakening George Whitefield's crypt is buried in a church he founded in Newburyport, MA. I can't believe I've lived here this long without having visited it. So, today I decided to drive the 2.7 miles over to Old South Church and visit.

While I was looking around at the outside of the church we met a guy on his way inside. I anxiously asked if there is a way to get a look inside. Just then the pastor of the church Rob John came to the door. Providentially he allowed us in for the '50 cent' tour. He said, next time, it is really helpful to call first...yeah, I was a little pushy, but hey it's George Whitefield's crypt! Thanks to Pastor Rob and his church member for being gracious to us. Take a look at some of the pictures below:
Though Whitefield never pastored at Old South, he was good friends with the first pastor there Jonathan Parsons with whom he is here buried (along with Joseph Mince, a minister who preached blind). It was pretty stunning standing at the pulpit, which felt about 10 feet higher than the pews for the congregation, under which Whitefiled is buried. After that, I took a seat by the crypt itself in the basement (that skull behind me is just a mold as his real skull is underneath with the rest of his remains!).

Of course Whitefield is in glory, awaiting the resurrection, and forgiven of all his sins through a mighty Christ, as he said, "What if thou hadst committed the sins of a million worlds? Christ's righteousness will cover, Christ's blood will cleanse thee from the guilt of all."

Comments

Christine G. said…
hey! my name is chris geiger, i'm an elder at old south. i'm teaching a class on powerpoint at salem state and thought i would do a ppt for george whitefield and found your blog.

feel free to swing by and visit again sometime. George is still there and so are we. would love to see you.

Popular posts from this blog

Return to Rome?

All right. Here is my first question to throw around to everyone: "Why am I not Roman Catholic?" (of course, if you are, help us understand why you are and why we should be(?)) Sounds like an easy question, but not so easy. Let me ask a few penetrating questions to get us going. These are all questions I've heard in different forms... Does Christ not have only one church? Does Rome not have the only consistent historical connection to the early church? Did not Rome determine the new Testament cannon of Scriptures? Does not Rome have what so many evangelicals lack: mystery, awe, contemplation, etc.? One more, does our theology go asunder so irreparably? Consider these Evangelical favorites: J RR Tolkien, G K Chesterton, and Mother Theresa. Are they not a sterling model of Christian imagination , thinking and service ? Hope this gets some discussion going.

The 'Greatest' Theologian/Preacher/Christian Philosopher

Here's a fun little discussion for us. Who is the greatest theologian since the apostle Paul? Sounds too subjective, but here are some criteria to evaluate by: 1) Personal life - Did this person's personal character reflect his convictions effectively? 2) Breadth of Influence - How wide and long has this person's influence effected the church and the world? 3) Depth of thought - How careful, biblical, and articulate were this persons's works? My vote to come...

Does Church History Matter?

In a so called unprecedented age, where all of Christianity is re-inventing itself, and all of Christian doctrine is up for re-writing , one must ask the question "Does church history matter?" (Just to write this almost makes me cringe at how unbelievably near-sighted my generation has become!) If we say 'yes it matters' too emphatically, the response will be "Why are you Protestants then?" Didn't Luther radically depart from centuries of theological teaching. One common criticism against Luther (and the Reformation) was "Can you alone be right and the whole world be wrong?" And, when Luther talks about Sola Scriptura, isn't he saying Scripture is all that matters? A few things about Luther. First, his Sola Scriptura argument was not that Scripture is the only authority for the church, but that Scripture alone is the final authority for the church. According to Luther, there can be, indeed should be, lesser authorities, including pasto